Loud-mouthing

Loud-mouthing

We learn stuff: in schools, courses, conferences, from reading and conversations. Then we repeat, often without much actual thinking in between.

This is bad enough but it gets worse: whoever repeats stuff louder is considered to be better. If somebody goes the extra mile and also becomes more aggressive, she’s often considered to be a “leader” – many careers have been built on this recipe.

Authentic knowledge is quiet. It is not acquired, it is created; and since it is more than the individual, it calls for humbleness!

Powerful people don’t need anybody’s recognition! This kind of independence is the only vantage point for control: controlling impulses, control to stay in context and control to think about timing when the time pressure is big; control for listening.

No control, no power.

“Me, me, me”, “I did this”, “My idea” and similar was invented by people with no inner power and the weak is almost always loud and they are always overcompensating.

To do big things we need to become quieter. Let’s leave loud-mouthing to others.

Laszlo Kovari is a writer and the founder of Prakhsis, an organizational development company that has been a pioneer in the concept of organic organizations. As a "consigliere" he has worked with founders, managers, CEOs and board members at startups, mid-sized companies and some of the Fortune 500 across North America and Europe. Laszlo is based in Prague, Czech Republic, supporting clients across Europe.

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